Unconventional Intervention

Winter 2017

The Southeast Atlanta Green Infrastructure Initiative completes largest permeable paver roadway project in North America

by Brad Causey

By

Unconventional Intervention

In July 2012, a series of storms caused combined sanitary and storm sewer overflows in parts of southeast Atlanta, flooding homes and streets. After visiting the flood-prone neighborhoods, Mayor Kasim Reed committed to finding a long-term solution. Thus began the Southeast Atlanta Green Infrastructure Initiative, which led to the largest permeable interlocking concrete roadway project in North America, more than four miles.

The flooding occurred at the nexus of piped natural drainage systems that transfer much of the runoff from downtown Atlanta, a highly impervious area, to Peoplestown, Mechanicsville and Summerhill. Located at a natural drainage point of a 1,500-acre watershed, these downstream neighborhoods finally found relief from the city’s unconventional intervention.

IMMEDIATE RESPONSE

With a mandate from the mayor’s office to solve flooding problems, the Department of Watershed Management rose to the challenge. “We went out into the field with our contractors to do assessments and came back with several projects that could be completed quickly to start providing immediate capacity relief,” said Todd Hill, Director of Environmental Management for the Department of Watershed Management. “We developed a phased approach.”

The bottom line, comprehensive solution meant managing about 24 million gallons of runoff. Phase one, a 30-day immediate response, began with cleaning up all inlets, raising curbs and installing bioswales and rain gardens on city property. These efforts resulted in 350,000 gallons of capacity relief. “Not a lot, but a start,” Mr. Hill said.

Phase two involved constructing a 5.8 million gallon combined sewer storage vault underneath a parking lot at Turner Field during the Atlanta Braves’ four-month offseason. In March 2015, work began on the permeable interlocking concrete roadway renovations that took nearly a year and a half to complete.

Phase three is currently in development and will mitigate eight million gallons through the construction of a combined sewer vault, capacity relief ponds and a community park to be constructed in Peoplestown on the lots that saw some of the worst flooding in 2012. The city is working with homeowners to acquire these properties at fair market value plus an additional percentage to compensate for relocation.



BIGGEST BANG FOR THE BUCK

At the outset of planning their roadway renovations, Mr. Hill and his team asked, “What will get us the biggest bang for our buck?” Considering permeable interlocking concrete pavement they agreed, “If we’re going to do a paver project, we want to have the greatest impact possible,’” Mr. Hill said. Looking back, the aggregate capacity relief storage provided by the paver system was less expensive than the water storage vaults.

With a budget of $15.8 million that initially included $1.1 million in allowances for restoring utility lines, the Department of Watershed Management began excavation and installation of permeable interlocking concrete pavers on the first of many streets upstream from the flood-prone areas. The goal was to use permeable pavers and the water storage capacity of deep aggregate reservoirs beneath them to provide downpipe capacity relief. “We picked residential streets that contributed to the flooding of our combined sewer system,” said Mr. Hill. Collectively, the four miles of permeable paver roads provided four million gallons of capacity relief.

Though the original plan had six miles of roadways slated to receive permeable pavers, once crews started peeling back the streets, they unearthed some unforeseen and unfortunate complications. On some of the larger stretches of roads, crews uncovered old streetcar lines alongside utility lines encased in two feet of concrete. “The timeline to even do a few feet at a time was going to be so outrageous that it would blow our schedule, increase cost and make it impossible for residents to access their homes, so we had to make a decision to eliminate that portion,” Mr. Hill said.

According to Mr. Hill, their desire was to place as many concrete pavers as possible and not deplete the budget on extra labor costs. This pragmatic approach was applied throughout the construction phase and brought the project to completion on time and under budget. But there were still many challenges that had to be overcome during the construction phase.

WHAT LIES BENEATH

With some street sections nearly 100 years old, the first surprise encountered by construction crews was a layer of old concrete below the asphalt roads that required additional time to remove. Once the roadways were opened up, a new set of challenges emerged. “We had utilities showing up that shouldn’t have been there, and some at depths that weren’t shown on any plans,” Mr. Hill said. Brick manholes were especially difficult to work around and many were replaced. Water mains and old pipes ruptured during excavation and required repair. Of the $1.1 million originally earmarked to address utilities, adjustments brought the total closer to $3 million by project completion.

Another main concern during construction dealt with the close proximity of older homes along some streets. Crews excavated two to four feet for the permeable pavement aggregate subbase layer and installed impermeable liners along the sidewalks to prevent lateral migration of stormwater toward these homes and their basements.

Due to their layout and age, street widths varied as much as a foot from one block to the next, adding a substantial amount of cutting time for the edge pavers. Despite this challenge, machine installation maintained an average rate of about 5,000 sf per day with no time required for concrete to cure.

Managing road closures and rerouting traffic, including public transit buses, also posed a significant challenge. “During the construction phase, there was a bit of inconvenience, to put it mildly,” said Cameo Garrett, External Communications Manager for the Department of Watershed Management. “It was very important that, as things changed during construction, we continuously provided information and updates to the affected communities.”

The original construction time estimates anticipated residents would lose access to their driveways for only a few days. But with all the utility issues encountered, the average road closures stretched to one and a half weeks. “Community outreach and engagement really needs to be taken into account,” said Cory Rayburn, Construction Project Manager for the Department of Watershed Management. “It’s very important for the contractor to have a public information officer onsite at all times during construction. We wrote that into our contract documents, and that’s something we recommend on all future projects.”



SUCCESSFUL RESULTS

“Permeable pavers are a very good solution for stormwater management, especially in highly urban areas with combined sewers that need capacity relief,” Mr. Hill said. “We have been surprised by and pleased with the amount of infiltration into the ground. We were estimating much less.” Many of the sloped streets included check dam systems to encourage infiltration. The paver streets store runoff from a four-hour, 25-year storm yielding 3.68 inches of rainfall.

While achieving capacity relief was the main goal accomplished by this project, the decision to use permeable interlocking concrete pavement also contributed to increased property values for some communities and led to new development investments. “We know the houses that are on the permeable paver streets are more sought after than on other streets in these neighborhoods,” Mr. Hill said. “The residents who live in those areas really love the pavers and think they’re very beautiful,” Ms. Garrett said.

“We have councilmembers pleased, and other councilmembers asking if they can have pavers in their districts,” Mr. Hill said. And the project has drawn not only the attention of some jealous neighbors, but national attention as well. The Department has received calls from other cities including Philadelphia, Washington D.C., San Francisco and Portland, Oregon, and has presented the project at numerous industry conferences throughout the country.

AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION IS WORTH A POUND OF CURE

The Atlanta Department of Watershed Management is now focusing efforts on educating contractors who will be working on or around their permeable pavement to prevent damage before it occurs. Nonetheless, some accidents happen from uninformed workers. In one instance, a concrete truck was washed out while parked on a permeable paver street. The runoff clogged the paver joints as well as the aggregate subbase, resulting in a $6,000 repair bill. In other instances, construction sites adjacent to the permeable paver roads needed to carefully manage sediment so it didn’t run into the street.

“It’s going to take education to ensure that anyone digging into these paver roadways has either gone through training or read the maintenance manual,” Mr. Rayburn said. So far, the Department has held an in-depth ‘Train the Trainer’ course for Watershed and Public Works employees based on the maintenance manual that was developed by the contractor, and will follow up with additional guidance and resources. “As of now, the protocol is to call our construction inspectors, the ones who were onsite during the paver installations, to monitor any tie-in construction involving water or sewer lines,” Mr. Rayburn said.

The city has a three-year contract with the project’s design-build contractor to provide service and maintenance for the permeable paver streets. “But after that, we will need a coordinated effort to help ensure the permeable paver streets are maintained,” Mr. Rayburn said.

REFLECTIONS IN HINDSIGHT

For any municipality contemplating permeable interlocking concrete pavement streets, Mr. Hill advises, “Spend a lot of time planning the process, thoroughly locate all utilities and determine if they will need rehab in the near future.” Particularly with older urban streets, there may be layers upon layers of unknown mysteries beneath the surface. “Have a full-blown SUE [Subsurface Utility Exploration] performed for every road to identify some of the harder-to-locate utilities before you actually start work,” Mr. Rayburn said. The SUE helps the design-builder come up with a more comprehensive design prior to excavation or construction, saving time and minimizing surprises.

“We are very grateful that our administration was so farsighted with regard to sustainability and making this a very green city,” Mr. Hill said. “They provided the necessary support to make these things happen.”

“Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development practices are not new. However, the regional application by municipalities to solve flooding and capacity relief is a developing industry,” Mr. Rayburn said. “The social and economic development that can occur when these practices are done right is definitely an added benefit.”

In Atlanta’s case, the green infrastructure initiative has had a direct impact on new investment. “The Historic Fourth Ward stormwater pond adjacent to the Atlanta Beltline created a miniature ecosystem within the heart of Atlanta which reconnected surrounding residents to nature. The main function of the facility is combined sewer capacity relief, but we have seen over $500 million in private redevelopment in the surrounding area,” Mr. Rayburn said.

“We always look for opportunities to utilize green infrastructure where our historical response would have been a bigger pipe or vault,” Mr. Rayburn said. “That way, you can solve the problem while creating a real benefit for the community.”

GOING GREEN

Visit www.AtlantaWatershed.org/GreenInfrastructure for more information on Atlanta’s green infrastructure initiatives.

Rosetta Hardscapes | Wetcast Landscapes: the next BIG THING
SEK | PolySweep Superior Strength Polymeric Sand